What's in Season: Passionfruit

Published on 05 March 2018 by Liz Macri of @kitcheninkAU

We are right in the middle of passionfruit season (peak season is from December to July) so how could I resist writing and cooking with them!

This sweet tropical scented fruit with its tart pulp has such a multitude of uses. Passionfruit are great in both sweet or savoury dishes, anything from dressings, sauces, desserts and salads. They are also an excellent source of beta carotene, dietary fibre, B complex vitamins, vitamin C and more iron than most other fruits.

Buying and Storage

To Select: Look for hard, shiny, slightly wrinkled skins. As passionfruit ripen, they become more wrinkled, so wrinkles aren’t bad in this case! Always give them a shake and choose the ones that feel heavy and sound full of pulp. Smell them – you want a sweet smelling tropical scent.

To Store: Passionfruit can be kept at room temperature until ripe then stored in the refrigerator. Once cut, the seeds and pulp should be refrigerated and consumed within one or two days.

To Prepare: Wash outer skins, then cut in half with a knife (try not to let the pulp escape!). Scoop out the pulp and seeds with a spoon, leaving the bitter white pith behind. Discard the skins. Generally, 1 passionfruit will yield about 1 tablespoon passionfruit pulp.


Did you know, botanically passionfruit are berries! Here are the most common varieties:

Purple - Have a hard, purple, slightly dimpled skin with yellow-orange pulp and black seeds. Common variety sold in supermarkets and fruit shops.

Panama - Have a hard, purple, smooth skin with yellow-orange pulp and black seeds. Common variety sold in supermarkets and fruit shops.

Yellow - Have a hard yellow, slightly dimpled skin with yellow-orange pulp.

Banana - Have an elongated shape, soft smooth skin and a yellow-orange pulp.

Quick Ideas for Passionfruit

Layered breakfast parfaits – Layer passionfruit pulp with sweetened yoghurt and breakfast oats or muesli. Serve chilled in glasses.

Passionfruit mess – Stir passionfruit into whipped vanilla infused cream. Fold in crumbled meringues. Transfer to chilled glasses and serve topped with white chocolate flakes.

Coconut buttermilk loaf with passionfruit and cream – Serve loaf in thick slices with whipped cream or custard and dollops of passionfruit pulp.

  • Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan-forced. Grease and line an 11cm x 21cm loaf pan with baking paper.
  • In a large bowl using an electric mixer, beat 125g softened butter, ¾ cup caster sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla extract until pale and creamy.
  • Add 2 eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.
  • Lightly fold in 2 cups self-raising flour into creamed mixture alternately with ¾ cup buttermilk, beginning and ending with flour.
  • Fold in ½ cup desiccated coconut.
  • Spoon mixture into pan, smoothing top.
  • Bake for 45-50 minutes until cooked when tested with a skewer. Cool in pan for 5 minutes, before turning onto a wire rack to cool completely.
Coconut Buttermilk Loaf with Passionfruit and Cream - yum!